SASSA 350 News Today 22nd November 2022

SASSA 350 News Today 22nd November 2022

SASSA 350 News – Some have voiced concerns that the R350 payment is not enough to cover the basic living expenses of its recipients. In this regard, President Cyril Ramaphosa has provided some clarity and an explanation.

Social Relief of Distress (SRD) grants, often known as the R350 award, have not been increased because President Cyril Ramaphosa claims the government does not have enough money.

Initially implemented in May 2020, the award was meant to be a stopgap solution to help those who needed it most during the pandemic. After the grant was put into place, it was quickly determined to be successful.

National Council of Provinces (NCOP) meetings were held in the Ugu regions of KwaZulu-Natal this week, allowing Ramaphosa to bring Parliament to the people.

Several people of the community voiced concerns, including the fact that the money will not be enough to support them, during the meeting.

The President has acknowledged that the gift may not be sufficient, but that it is all the government can do at this time.

Even though the government cannot afford to increase the grant next year, Ramaphosa assured citizens that the program would continue. “We know that to most of you, the money is not enough and that people want the money to be increased,” he said.

The SRD grant income threshold has been gazetted to increase this year, from R350 to R624, bringing it in line with the food poverty line and making it possible for more people to apply, qualify, and receive some financial support.

The South African National Treasury has been dropping hints that it may be unable to fully fund the SRD award.

For those between the ages of 18 and 59 who are struggling to make ends meet and don’t qualify for any other forms of social assistance, the long-discussed idea of adopting a permanent Basic Income Grant (BIG) has finally become a reality.

Although those who received the initial SRD grant are appreciative for the financial aid in whatever form, a rise in the threshold (to R624) would be especially welcome.

With South Africa’s high cost of living, a monthly income of R350 is not nearly enough.

While the planned reforms are certainly welcome, the National Treasury has cautioned South Africans that implementing them will need resources the government may not now possess.

South Africans are now eagerly awaiting the implementation of the reforms made possible by both grants.